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Latin Paleography, Lesson 3: Protogothic Notarial Hands

2020.05.13 16:44 SheepExplosion Latin Paleography, Lesson 3: Protogothic Notarial Hands

Lesson 3: Protogothic Notarial Hand
The manuscript for this lesson (requires Flash to view) is probably one of my favorites to teach with - Templars, Emperors, the Teutonic Order, and sartorial controversy. It comes from the papal chancery of Honorius III. The letter forms are very similar to the previous lesson's protogothic, but with several modifications which make it a notarial protogothic.
Note that the ascenders (vertical strokes) on the top line are much longer than others, which is called litteris celestis. Note also that the 'q' hooks to the left like a 'g', a feature particular to Roman notarial scripts. Finally, if the word order at times seems odd, this is to follow a pattern known as prose cursus, wherein sense units end in a regular metrical pattern (usually cursus planus -xx-x, cursus tardus -xx-xx, or cursus velox -xxxx-x). In papal diplomae, this is an anti-forgery feature, as is the deliberate use of the entire page and the wide spacing of the final dating clause at the bottom.
I really love this document because the subject matter is so trivial, and Honorius' tone seems to me to border on bitchy. He's got nothing on Innocent III there, though, who was the pontifex maximus of sass.
Although there is little horizontal compression to the script, making it a protogothic, note that the frequent use of the short-s in a terminal position shows a transition towards Gothic.
Transcription
1 Honorius ep[iscopu]s servus servor[um] dei . Dilectis filiis . {{ }} . mag[ist]ro et fratribus domus militie Templi . Sal[u]t[em] et ap[osto]licam . ben[edictione] . Quanto vos ampliori caritate diligim[us] .
2 tanto nobis amplius displiceret si quod absit reprehensione seu etiam irrisione dignum aliquid faceretis . Siquidem privilegia fr[atr]ibus domus s[an]c[t]e Marie Teuto-
3 nicorum ab ap[osto]lica sede concessa manifeste demonstrant . q[uo]d ordo v[este]r in cl[er]icis et militibus ac aliis fratrib[us] hospitalis vero in pauperib[us] et infirmis in ip[s]a
4 domo iam dudum extitit institutus . et per sedem ap[osto]licam confirmatus . Licet autem fr[atr]es ip[s]i tum propter negligentiam suam dum essent pauci et pauperes
5 tum etiam propter scandali v[est]ri metum . tam in habitu deferendo . quam in quib[us]dam aliis . aliquando contra institutio[n]em fecerunt memoratam . nos tamen
6 inclinate sue religionis merito et precibus carissimi in [Christ]o filii n[ost]ri . F[redrici] . romanor[um] imperatoris illustris semper augusti et regis sicilie qui in
7 die coronationis sue id a nobis pro speciali munere postulavit . institutionem ip[s]am de communi consilio fratrum n[ost]rorum n[ost]ro privilegio confirmavimus .
8 domum ip[s]am aliis privilegiis indulgentiis et libertatibus munientes . Accepimus autem quod vos occasione alborum mantellor[um] super quibus deferendis spe
9 cialem a nobis indulgentiam impetrarunt . pro eo q[uo]d in hoc specialiter fecisse contra institutionem hui[us]modi videbantur . moti estis aliquantulum contra eos .
10 quod quantum sit v[est]ra religione indignum quisquis recogitare voluerit . facile recognoscet. Si enim vos ab hui[us]modi motu . nec ap[osto]lica nec imperialis
11 reverentia cohibet . cohibere saltem om[n]ium id audientium substannatio vos deberet . quibus videtur sicut est revera ridiculum vos indigne ferre alios a vobis
12 album portare mantellum . presertim a v[est]ro habitu sic distinctum signaculo speciali .' ut timeri non possit . ne quis unius ordinis fr[atr]es ordinis e[ss]e alteri[us] ar
13 bitretur . Id[eo]q[ue] circumspectionem v[est]ram attente rogandum duximus et hortandam . quatinus om[n]i rancore deposito . siquem forte contra dictos fr[atr]es occasione
14 hui[us]modi concepistis ambuletis in caritas sp[irit]u et unitatis vinculo cum eisdem . eor[um] profectum sicut decet viros religiosos . proprium reputantes . ita
15 q[uo]d idem imperator cum illuc deo dante pervenerit .' fraternam inter vos inveniat unitatem . quia si aliter faceretis . nonsolum ap[osto]licam et imperialem in-
16 curreretis offensam .' ver[um]etiam in detractationem v[est]ram ora quor[um]libet audientium laxaretis . Dat[um] Verul[ensis] . XV . k[a]l[ends] maii .
17 pontificatus n[ost]ri anno sexto .
Notes and Hints
I just love this document so much for its contents. Getting both the pope and the holy roman emperor tangled in a dispute over sartorial habits? chef's kiss Yes, that was an intentional pun.
Chancery, chancellor, and cancel all come from cancellus, a lattice or grid. The chancery, and thus the chancellor, would be separated from the court by a latticework or railing. To cancel something, in paleographic terms, is to draw Xs through it, as opposed to expunction (dots above and/or below the letters) or erasure (scratching out with a pen knife). Note that if you see something crossed out in a medieval document, it is not erased or removed. Quite the opposite, in fact: that's how they did highlighting.
The first line has a space between "filiis" and "magistro" where an initial should go, but it has not been filled in.
Examples of cursus:
Previous Weeks
Lesson 1: Basics
lesson 2: Protogothic
submitted by SheepExplosion to latin [link] [comments]


2017.11.09 02:27 duffil ASA tunnel routing config

To start with: I've got zero ASA experience, other than some small changes to this box adding subnets to the tunnel.
We have one remote location that has an ASA. This location had two separate DIA circuits, one was used for local internet breakout, the other was dedicated for a site-to-site back to our data center. Apparently the site has lost the VPN circuit and has no chance of getting it back.
EDIT: current config is below. We did not create a new tunnel group, just changed the interface everything pointed to.
EDIT: resolution this is resolved. The traffic over the subnet which wasn't showing encap was monitoring traffic. The server it was monitoring turns out to have been decommissioned without notifying IT.
Changes made to date: In order to get connectivity back, we changed a couple of lines to point to the internet interface instead of the VPN (physical interfaces named internet and vpns). I changed the route statements (lines 245-254) to reflect the internet interface, and the cryptomap ACL (line 295) as well as the crypto map interface statement. (the running config below is prior to those changes, still showing vpns interface in use)
At this point, all tunnels are up enough for DCs to sync, but I've got no other connectivity. No ICMP, no RDP, nothing. I've tracerouted from the inside interface on the ASA and it's clear that the traffic is exiting to public internet and not getting put in the tunnel. I can assume that this is because of the route statements pointing at the 'internet' label. So if I understand the config correctly, I need to be able to point those private subnets into the tunnel...which is no longer on a dedicated named interface. Can I just remove the static routes on the subnets that are tunnelled and let the box figure it out?
Also-I know there are a ton of issues in this config. At present, I can't fix a lot of what is wrong.
EDIT: removed legacy config for clarity. I've applied some changes specified by mls577 and troubleshooting per baudrillard_is_fake and I have verified the only tunnel currently having issues is the 10.254.225.0/24. I have decap but no encap on this subnet.
routes: ASA# sh route
Gateway of last resort is public-ip to network 0.0.0.0
C 192.168.13.0 255.255.255.0 is directly connected, inside S public-ip 255.255.255.255 [1/0] via public-ip, internet S 10.2.10.0 255.255.255.0 [1/0] via public-ip, internet S 10.254.225.0 255.255.255.0 [1/0] via public-ip, internet S 10.2.60.0 255.255.255.0 [1/0] via public-ip, internet S 10.3.60.0 255.255.255.0 [1/0] via public-ip, internet S 10.1.60.0 255.255.255.0 [1/0] via public-ip, internet S 10.254.60.0 255.255.255.0 [1/0] via public-ip, internet S 192.168.0.0 255.255.255.0 [1/0] via public-ip, internet S 192.168.16.0 255.255.255.0 [1/0] via public-ip, internet S 192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0 [1/0] via public-ip, internet C public-ip 255.255.255.248 is directly connected, internet S* 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 [1/0] via public-ip, internet ASA#
current config:
ASA# sh run : Saved : : Serial Number: JMX1520L0WA : Hardware: ASA5520, 2048 MB RAM, CPU Pentium 4 Celeron 2000 MHz : ASA Version 8.4(7)30 ! hostname ASA enable password UXxKNjeRCFMpu0ff encrypted passwd UXxKNjeRCFMpu0ff encrypted names ! interface GigabitEthernet0/0 nameif internet security-level 0 ip address public-ip 255.255.255.248 ! interface GigabitEthernet0/1 shutdown nameif vpns security-level 0 ip address public-ip 255.255.255.248 ! interface GigabitEthernet0/2 shutdown no nameif no security-level no ip address ! interface GigabitEthernet0/3 nameif inside security-level 100 ip address 192.168.13.254 255.255.255.0 ! interface Management0/0 nameif management security-level 100 no ip address management-only ! boot system disk0:/asa847-30-k8.bin ftp mode passive same-security-traffic permit inter-interface object network obj-192.168.13.0 subnet 192.168.13.0 255.255.255.0 object network obj-192.168.0.0 subnet 192.168.0.0 255.255.255.0 object network obj-10.1.60.0 subnet 10.1.60.0 255.255.255.0 object network obj-192.168.0.0-01 subnet 192.168.0.0 255.255.0.0 object network obj-192.168.16.0 subnet 192.168.16.0 255.255.255.0 object network obj-10.3.60.0 subnet 10.3.60.0 255.255.255.0 object network obj-10.254.60.0 subnet 10.254.60.0 255.255.255.0 object network obj-192.168.1.0 subnet 192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0 object network obj-10.2.10.0 subnet 10.2.10.0 255.255.255.0 object network obj-10.2.60.0 subnet 10.2.60.0 255.255.255.0 object network obj-192.168.13.41 host 192.168.13.41 object network obj-192.168.13.41-01 host 192.168.13.41 object network obj-192.168.13.41-02 host 192.168.13.41 object network obj-192.168.13.41-03 host 192.168.13.41 object network obj-192.168.13.41-04 host 192.168.13.41 object network obj-192.168.13.41-05 host 192.168.13.41 object network obj-192.168.13.41-06 host 192.168.13.41 object network obj-192.168.13.41-07 host 192.168.13.41 object network obj-192.168.13.41-08 host 192.168.13.41 object network obj-192.168.13.41-09 host 192.168.13.41 object network obj-192.168.13.41-10 host 192.168.13.41 object network obj-192.168.13.41-11 host 192.168.13.41 object network obj-192.168.13.41-12 host 192.168.13.41 object network obj-192.168.13.41-13 host 192.168.13.41 object network obj-192.168.13.41-14 host 192.168.13.41 object network obj-192.168.13.41-15 host 192.168.13.41 object network obj-192.168.13.41-16 host 192.168.13.41 object network obj-192.168.13.41-17 host 192.168.13.41 object network obj-192.168.13.41-18 host 192.168.13.41 object network obj-192.168.13.41-19 host 192.168.13.41 object network obj-192.168.13.41-20 host 192.168.13.41 object network obj-192.168.13.6 host 192.168.13.6 object network obj_any subnet 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 object network obj-192.168.13.5 host 192.168.13.5 object-group service rdp tcp port-object eq 10338 port-object eq 10339 access-list nat-internet extended permit ip 192.168.13.0 255.255.255.0 any access-list vpns_cryptomap extended permit ip 192.168.13.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.0.0 255.255.255.0 access-list vpns_cryptomap extended permit ip 192.168.13.0 255.255.255.0 10.1.60.0 255.255.255.0 access-list vpns_cryptomap extended permit ip 192.168.13.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.16.0 255.255.255.0 access-list vpns_cryptomap extended permit ip 192.168.13.0 255.255.255.0 10.254.60.0 255.255.255.0 access-list vpns_cryptomap extended permit ip 192.168.13.0 255.255.255.0 10.3.60.0 255.255.255.0 access-list vpns_cryptomap extended permit ip 192.168.13.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0 access-list vpns_cryptomap extended permit ip 192.168.13.0 255.255.255.0 10.2.10.0 255.255.255.0 access-list vpns_cryptomap extended permit ip 192.168.13.0 255.255.255.0 10.2.60.0 255.255.255.0 access-list vpns_cryptomap extended permit ip 192.168.13.0 255.255.255.0 10.254.225.0 255.255.255.0 access-list inside_nat0_outbound extended permit ip 192.168.13.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.0.0 255.255.255.0 access-list inside_nat0_outbound extended permit ip 192.168.13.0 255.255.255.0 10.1.60.0 255.255.255.0 access-list inside_nat0_outbound extended permit ip 192.168.13.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.0.0 255.255.0.0 access-list inside_nat0_outbound extended permit ip 192.168.13.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.16.0 255.255.255.0 access-list inside_nat0_outbound extended permit ip 192.168.13.0 255.255.255.0 10.3.60.0 255.255.255.0 access-list inside_nat0_outbound extended permit ip 192.168.13.0 255.255.255.0 10.254.60.0 255.255.255.0 access-list inside_nat0_outbound extended permit ip 192.168.13.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0 access-list inside_nat0_outbound extended permit ip 192.168.13.0 255.255.255.0 10.2.10.0 255.255.255.0 access-list inside_nat0_outbound extended permit ip 192.168.13.0 255.255.255.0 10.2.60.0 255.255.255.0 access-list inside_nat0_outbound extended permit ip 192.168.13.0 255.255.255.0 10.254.225.0 255.255.255.0 access-list inside-in extended permit icmp any any access-list inside-in extended permit ip any any access-list vpns-in extended permit icmp any any access-list vpns-in extended permit ip any any access-list internet-in extended permit gre any host 192.168.13.6 log access-list internet-in extended permit ip host public-ip any access-list internet-in extended permit ip public-ip 255.255.248.0 any access-list internet-in extended permit ip public-ip 255.255.255.0 any access-list internet-in extended permit icmp any any access-list internet-in extended permit ip host public-ip any access-list internet-in remark Migration, ACE (line 11) expanded: permit tcp any public-ip 255.255.255.248 object-group rdp access-list internet-in remark Migration: End of expansion access-list internet-in extended permit tcp any host 192.168.13.41 eq 8015 access-list internet-in extended permit tcp any host 192.168.13.41 eq 8020 access-list internet-in extended permit tcp any host 192.168.13.41 eq 8000 access-list internet-in extended permit tcp any host 192.168.13.41 eq 8001 access-list internet-in extended permit tcp any host 192.168.13.41 eq 8002 access-list internet-in extended permit tcp any host 192.168.13.41 eq 8003 access-list internet-in extended permit tcp any host 192.168.13.41 eq 8004 access-list internet-in extended permit tcp any host 192.168.13.41 eq 8005 access-list internet-in extended permit tcp any host 192.168.13.41 eq 8006 access-list internet-in extended permit tcp any host 192.168.13.41 eq 8007 access-list internet-in extended permit tcp any host 192.168.13.41 eq 8008 access-list internet-in extended permit tcp any host 192.168.13.41 eq 8009 access-list internet-in extended permit tcp any host 192.168.13.41 eq 8010 access-list internet-in extended permit tcp any host 192.168.13.41 eq 8011 access-list internet-in extended permit tcp any host 192.168.13.41 eq 8012 access-list internet-in extended permit tcp any host 192.168.13.41 eq 8013 access-list internet-in extended permit tcp any host 192.168.13.41 eq 8014 access-list internet-in extended permit tcp any host 192.168.13.41 eq 8016 access-list internet-in extended permit tcp any host 192.168.13.41 eq 8017 access-list internet-in extended permit tcp any host 192.168.13.41 eq 8018 access-list internet-in extended permit tcp any host 192.168.13.41 eq 8019 access-list internet-in extended permit tcp any host 192.168.13.6 eq pptp access-list internet-in extended permit tcp any host 192.168.13.5 eq 3389 access-list acl-conn-param-tcp-01 extended permit tcp host 192.168.13.253 any access-list acl-conn-param-tcp-01 extended permit tcp host 192.168.13.5 any access-list acl-conn-param-tcp-01 extended permit tcp host 192.168.13.41 any pager lines 30 logging enable logging buffered debugging logging asdm debugging mtu internet 1500 mtu vpns 1500 mtu inside 1500 mtu management 1500 ip verify reverse-path interface internet no failover icmp unreachable rate-limit 1 burst-size 1 icmp permit any internet icmp permit any vpns icmp permit any inside asdm image disk0:/asdm-733.bin no asdm history enable arp timeout 14400 no arp permit-nonconnected nat (inside,any) source static obj-192.168.13.0 obj-192.168.13.0 destination static obj-192.168.0.0 obj-192.168.0.0 no-proxy-arp route-lookup nat (inside,any) source static obj-192.168.13.0 obj-192.168.13.0 destination static obj-10.1.60.0 obj-10.1.60.0 no-proxy-arp route-lookup nat (inside,any) source static obj-192.168.13.0 obj-192.168.13.0 destination static obj-192.168.0.0-01 obj-192.168.0.0-01 no-proxy-arp route-lookup nat (inside,any) source static obj-192.168.13.0 obj-192.168.13.0 destination static obj-192.168.16.0 obj-192.168.16.0 no-proxy-arp route-lookup nat (inside,any) source static obj-192.168.13.0 obj-192.168.13.0 destination static obj-10.3.60.0 obj-10.3.60.0 no-proxy-arp route-lookup nat (inside,any) source static obj-192.168.13.0 obj-192.168.13.0 destination static obj-10.254.60.0 obj-10.254.60.0 no-proxy-arp route-lookup nat (inside,any) source static obj-192.168.13.0 obj-192.168.13.0 destination static obj-192.168.1.0 obj-192.168.1.0 no-proxy-arp route-lookup nat (inside,any) source static obj-192.168.13.0 obj-192.168.13.0 destination static obj-10.2.10.0 obj-10.2.10.0 no-proxy-arp route-lookup nat (inside,any) source static obj-192.168.13.0 obj-192.168.13.0 destination static obj-10.2.60.0 obj-10.2.60.0 no-proxy-arp route-lookup ! object network obj-192.168.13.41 nat (inside,internet) static interface service tcp 8015 8015 object network obj-192.168.13.41-01 nat (inside,internet) static interface service tcp 8000 8000 object network obj-192.168.13.41-02 nat (inside,internet) static interface service tcp 8001 8001 object network obj-192.168.13.41-03 nat (inside,internet) static interface service tcp 8002 8002 object network obj-192.168.13.41-04 nat (inside,internet) static interface service tcp 8003 8003 object network obj-192.168.13.41-05 nat (inside,internet) static interface service tcp 8004 8004 object network obj-192.168.13.41-06 nat (inside,internet) static interface service tcp 8005 8005 object network obj-192.168.13.41-07 nat (inside,internet) static interface service tcp 8006 8006 object network obj-192.168.13.41-08 nat (inside,internet) static interface service tcp 8007 8007 object network obj-192.168.13.41-09 nat (inside,internet) static interface service tcp 8008 8008 object network obj-192.168.13.41-10 nat (inside,internet) static interface service tcp 8009 8009 object network obj-192.168.13.41-11 nat (inside,internet) static interface service tcp 8010 8010 object network obj-192.168.13.41-12 nat (inside,internet) static interface service tcp 8011 8011 object network obj-192.168.13.41-13 nat (inside,internet) static interface service tcp 8012 8012 object network obj-192.168.13.41-14 nat (inside,internet) static interface service tcp 8013 8013 object network obj-192.168.13.41-15 nat (inside,internet) static interface service tcp 8014 8014 object network obj-192.168.13.41-16 nat (inside,internet) static interface service tcp 8016 8016 object network obj-192.168.13.41-17 nat (inside,internet) static interface service tcp 8017 8017 object network obj-192.168.13.41-18 nat (inside,internet) static interface service tcp 8018 8018 object network obj-192.168.13.41-19 nat (inside,internet) static interface service tcp 8019 8019 object network obj-192.168.13.41-20 nat (inside,internet) static interface service tcp 8020 8020 object network obj-192.168.13.6 nat (inside,internet) static public-ip object network obj_any nat (inside,internet) dynamic interface object network obj-192.168.13.5 nat (inside,internet) static interface service tcp 3389 10339 access-group vpns-in in interface internet access-group inside-in in interface inside route internet 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 public-ip route internet 10.1.60.0 255.255.255.0 public-ip 1 route internet 10.2.10.0 255.255.255.0 public-ip 1 route internet 10.2.60.0 255.255.255.0 public-ip 1 route internet 10.3.60.0 255.255.255.0 public-ip 1 route internet 10.254.60.0 255.255.255.0 public-ip 1 route internet 10.254.225.0 255.255.255.0 public-ip 1 route internet public-ip 255.255.255.255 public-ip 1 route internet 192.168.0.0 255.255.255.0 public-ip 1 route internet 192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0 public-ip 1 route internet 192.168.16.0 255.255.255.0 public-ip 1 timeout xlate 3:00:00 timeout pat-xlate 0:00:30 timeout conn 1:00:00 half-closed 0:10:00 udp 0:02:00 icmp 0:00:02 timeout sunrpc 0:10:00 h323 0:05:00 h225 1:00:00 mgcp 0:05:00 mgcp-pat 0:05:00 timeout sip 0:30:00 sip_media 0:02:00 sip-invite 0:03:00 sip-disconnect 0:02:00 timeout sip-provisional-media 0:02:00 uauth 0:05:00 absolute timeout tcp-proxy-reassembly 0:01:00 timeout floating-conn 0:00:00 dynamic-access-policy-record DfltAccessPolicy user-identity default-domain LOCAL aaa authentication ssh console LOCAL http server enable http 192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0 management http public-ip 255.255.248.0 internet http public-ip 255.255.255.255 internet http 192.168.13.0 255.255.255.0 inside http 192.168.0.0 255.255.255.0 inside http public-ip 255.255.255.255 internet http 192.81.92.2 255.255.255.255 internet http 10.2.10.0 255.255.255.0 inside snmp-server host no snmp-server location no snmp-server contact snmp-server community ***** snmp-server enable traps snmp authentication linkup linkdown coldstart service resetinbound crypto ipsec ikev1 transform-set ESP-AES-256-MD5 esp-aes-256 esp-md5-hmac crypto ipsec ikev1 transform-set ESP-DES-SHA esp-des esp-sha-hmac crypto ipsec ikev1 transform-set ESP-3DES-SHA esp-3des esp-sha-hmac crypto ipsec ikev1 transform-set ESP-DES-MD5 esp-des esp-md5-hmac crypto ipsec ikev1 transform-set ESP-AES-192-MD5 esp-aes-192 esp-md5-hmac crypto ipsec ikev1 transform-set ESP-3DES-MD5 esp-3des esp-md5-hmac crypto ipsec ikev1 transform-set ESP-AES-256-SHA esp-aes-256 esp-sha-hmac crypto ipsec ikev1 transform-set ESP-AES-192-SHA esp-aes-192 esp-sha-hmac crypto ipsec ikev1 transform-set ESP-AES-128-MD5 esp-aes esp-md5-hmac crypto ipsec ikev1 transform-set ESP-AES-128-SHA esp-aes esp-sha-hmac crypto ipsec security-association lifetime seconds 86400 crypto map vpns_map0 3 match address vpns_cryptomap crypto map vpns_map0 3 set peer public-ip crypto map vpns_map0 3 set ikev1 transform-set ESP-AES-128-SHA crypto map vpns_map0 interface internet crypto ikev1 enable internet crypto ikev1 policy 5 authentication pre-share encryption 3des hash sha group 2 lifetime 86400 crypto ikev1 policy 10 authentication pre-share encryption des hash sha group 2 lifetime 86400 crypto ikev1 policy 30 authentication pre-share encryption 3des hash md5 group 1 lifetime 86400 crypto ikev1 policy 50 authentication pre-share encryption aes hash sha group 5 lifetime 86400 ssh key-exchange group dh-group1-sha1 console timeout 0 management-access inside threat-detection basic-threat threat-detection statistics access-list no threat-detection statistics tcp-intercept webvpn group-policy GroupPolicy1 internal group-policy GroupPolicy1 attributes vpn-filter none vpn-tunnel-protocol ikev1 ssl-client username redacted tunnel-group public-ip type ipsec-l2l tunnel-group public-ip general-attributes default-group-policy GroupPolicy1 tunnel-group public-ip ipsec-attributes ikev1 pre-shared-key ***** peer-id-validate nocheck tunnel-group public-ip type ipsec-l2l tunnel-group public-ip ipsec-attributes ikev1 pre-shared-key ***** ! class-map inspection_default match default-inspection-traffic class-map class-conn-param-tcp-01 match access-list acl-conn-param-tcp-01 ! ! policy-map type inspect dns preset_dns_map parameters message-length maximum 512 policy-map policy-conn-param-inside class class-conn-param-tcp-01 set connection random-sequence-number disable policy-map global_policy class inspection_default inspect dns preset_dns_map inspect ftp inspect h323 h225 inspect h323 ras inspect rsh inspect rtsp inspect esmtp inspect sqlnet inspect skinny inspect sunrpc inspect xdmcp inspect sip inspect netbios inspect tftp inspect pptp inspect ip-options ! : end 
submitted by duffil to networking [link] [comments]


2017.10.05 19:46 Luk1ko Unable to ping public IP of server behind ASA 5512

We replaced a Meraki MX with a Cisco ASA, and I'm unable to reach the public IPs of servers behind our firewall now. The server has working Internet access. All packet tracer runs show successful NATing and are allowed. The firewall is open to limit the problem while testing.
I'm assuming it's a misconfigured NAT rule or another option I've forgotten to enable.
I've been at it for hours, and I can't seem to ping the public IP nor access it externally for services.
The ASA is directly behind the ISP modem and the modem is in bridged mode. The server IP is 192.168.108.44 NAT'd to 5x.xx.xx.53
Any help is greatly appreciated.
ISP Modem Settings
Internet Settings Gateway MAC Address 78:CD:8E:C2:D2:58 WAN MAC Address 78:CD:8E:C2:D2:5B WAN DHCP IP Address 98.204.5.208 WAN DHCP IPv6 Address ::/64 WAN DHCP IPv6 DNS (primary) :: WAN DHCP IPv6 DNS (secondary) :: WAN DHCP Subnet Mask 255.255.248.0 WAN DHCP Default Gateway 98.204.0.1 WAN Internet IP Address 50.xx.xx.62 DNS (primary) 75.75.75.75 DNS (secondary) 75.75.76.76 DHCP Time Remaining 86h:12m:46s Date Oct-4-2017 Static IP Block 50.xx.xx.62/28
ASA Config
ASA Version 9.6(3)1 ! hostname ciscoasa enable password lsiIw5sJErKSQdQv encrypted xlate per-session deny tcp any4 any4 xlate per-session deny tcp any4 any6 xlate per-session deny tcp any6 any4 xlate per-session deny tcp any6 any6 xlate per-session deny udp any4 any4 eq domain xlate per-session deny udp any4 any6 eq domain xlate per-session deny udp any6 any4 eq domain xlate per-session deny udp any6 any6 eq domain passwd 2KFQnbNIdI.2KYOU encrypted names
! interface GigabitEthernet0/0 description Uplink To ComRTR nameif outside security-level 100 ip address 5x.xx.xx.50 255.255.255.240 ! interface GigabitEthernet0/1 description Link To 1941 nameif inside security-level 100 ip address 172.17.25.1 255.255.255.0 ! interface GigabitEthernet0/2 shutdown no nameif no security-level no ip address ! interface GigabitEthernet0/3 shutdown no nameif no security-level no ip address ! interface GigabitEthernet0/4 shutdown no nameif no security-level no ip address ! interface GigabitEthernet0/5 shutdown no nameif no security-level no ip address ! interface Management0/0 management-only shutdown no nameif no security-level no ip address ! interface GigabitEthernet1/0 shutdown no nameif no security-level no ip address ! interface GigabitEthernet1/1 shutdown no nameif no security-level no ip address ! interface GigabitEthernet1/2 shutdown no nameif no security-level no ip address ! interface GigabitEthernet1/3 shutdown no nameif no security-level no ip address ! interface GigabitEthernet1/4 shutdown no nameif no security-level no ip address ! interface GigabitEthernet1/5 shutdown no nameif no security-level no ip address ! boot system disk0:/asa963-1-smp-k8.bin ftp mode passive clock timezone EST -5 clock summer-time EDT recurring same-security-traffic permit inter-interface same-security-traffic permit intra-interface object network inside-dmz-network subnet 172.17.25.0 255.255.255.192 description inside dmz object network milestone-corporate-internal-ip host 192.168.108.44 object network milestone-corporate-external-ip host 5x.xx.xx.53 object network user-network subnet 192.168.128.0 255.255.255.0 object network server-network subnet 192.168.108.0 255.255.255.0 object network transit-network subnet 192.168.118.0 255.255.255.0 object-group protocol DM_INLINE_PROTOCOL_1 protocol-object ip protocol-object icmp object-group protocol DM_INLINE_PROTOCOL_2 protocol-object ip protocol-object icmp object-group protocol DM_INLINE_PROTOCOL_3 protocol-object ip protocol-object icmp object-group protocol DM_INLINE_PROTOCOL_4 protocol-object ip protocol-object icmp access-list inside_access_in extended permit object-group DM_INLINE_PROTOCOL_1 any any access-list outside_access_in extended permit object-group DM_INLINE_PROTOCOL_2 any any access-list inside_access_out extended permit object-group DM_INLINE_PROTOCOL_3 any any access-list outside_access_out extended permit object-group DM_INLINE_PROTOCOL_4 any any pager lines 24 mtu outside 1500 mtu inside 1500 icmp unreachable rate-limit 1 burst-size 1 asdm image disk0:/asdm-781-150.bin no asdm history enable arp timeout 14400 no arp permit-nonconnected arp rate-limit 8192 nat (outside,outside) source static any any destination static milestone-corporate-external-ip milestone-corporate-internal-ip nat (inside,outside) source static milestone-corporate-internal-ip milestone-corporate-external-ip dns nat (inside,outside) source dynamic inside-dmz-network interface nat (inside,outside) source dynamic user-network interface nat (inside,outside) source dynamic server-network interface nat (inside,outside) source dynamic transit-network interface nat (inside,outside) source dynamic any interface nat (any,any) source static any any access-group outside_access_in in interface outside access-group outside_access_out out interface outside access-group inside_access_in in interface inside access-group inside_access_out out interface inside router ospf 1 network 10.1.10.0 255.255.255.0 area 0 network 172.17.25.0 255.255.255.192 area 0 area 0 log-adj-changes redistribute static metric 10 metric-type 1 subnets ! route outside 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 5x.xx.xx.62 200 route inside 192.168.108.0 255.255.255.0 172.17.25.2 1 route inside 192.168.118.0 255.255.255.0 172.17.25.2 1 route inside 192.168.128.0 255.255.255.0 172.17.25.2 1 route inside 192.168.226.0 255.255.255.0 172.17.25.3 1 timeout xlate 3:00:00 timeout pat-xlate 0:00:30 timeout conn 1:00:00 half-closed 0:10:00 udp 0:02:00 sctp 0:02:00 icmp 0:00:02 timeout sunrpc 0:10:00 h323 0:05:00 h225 1:00:00 mgcp 0:05:00 mgcp-pat 0:05:00 timeout sip 0:30:00 sip_media 0:02:00 sip-invite 0:03:00 sip-disconnect 0:02:00 timeout sip-provisional-media 0:02:00 uauth 0:05:00 absolute timeout tcp-proxy-reassembly 0:01:00 timeout floating-conn 0:00:00 timeout conn-holddown 0:00:15 user-identity default-domain LOCAL aaa authentication ssh console LOCAL http server enable http 192.168.128.0 255.255.255.0 inside http 10.2.10.0 255.255.255.0 inside http 172.17.25.0 255.255.255.192 inside no snmp-server location no snmp-server contact crypto ipsec security-association pmtu-aging infinite crypto ca trustpool policy telnet timeout 5 ssh stricthostkeycheck ssh 192.168.128.0 255.255.255.0 inside ssh 172.17.25.0 255.255.255.192 inside ssh timeout 60 ssh key-exchange group dh-group1-sha1 console timeout 0 threat-detection basic-threat threat-detection statistics access-list no threat-detection statistics tcp-intercept ntp server 129.6.15.30 source outside prefer ntp server 129.6.15.28 source outside dynamic-access-policy-record DfltAccessPolicy username bcooper password bESD75/eXenKs8C2 encrypted privilege 15 username xadmin password R.MXJOsjk9M6sb0Y encrypted privilege 15 ! class-map inspection_default match default-inspection-traffic ! ! policy-map type inspect dns preset_dns_map parameters message-length maximum client auto message-length maximum 512 no tcp-inspection policy-map global_policy class inspection_default inspect dns preset_dns_map inspect ftp inspect h323 h225 inspect h323 ras inspect ip-options inspect netbios inspect rsh inspect rtsp inspect skinny inspect esmtp inspect sqlnet inspect sunrpc inspect tftp inspect sip inspect xdmcp inspect icmp inspect icmp error ! service-policy global_policy global prompt hostname context no call-home reporting anonymous call-home profile CiscoTAC-1 no active destination address http https://tools.cisco.com/its/service/oddce/services/DDCEService destination address email [email protected] destination transport-method http subscribe-to-alert-group diagnostic subscribe-to-alert-group environment subscribe-to-alert-group inventory periodic monthly 9 subscribe-to-alert-group configuration periodic monthly 9 subscribe-to-alert-group telemetry periodic daily Cryptochecksum:9b6d5d742ef4bdc41a63b27038125408 : end
submitted by Luk1ko to networking [link] [comments]


2016.08.20 05:56 bananawhom OSF doc "Countering State Capture" is a guide to state capture

From DCleaks.com, /2015pthink tank fund countering state capture october 15 2015/ttf countering state capture prd 10.15.2015.pdf
I've tried to reproduce the report below for those who don't want to download the pdf. Had to cut the footnotes and several pages to fit.
Basically this document describes the problem of "state capture" and how the OSF plans to tackle it. They define state capture as "the institutionalized particularistic influence of organized actors over policy formation and implementation, which negatively impacts the fundamentals of a democratic system, the logic of governance, social norms, and trust in public institutions."
Those are all things the OSF does.
It's likely they assume the ends justify the means when they do it. The difference between them and states they target hinges on the label of "particularistic." I'm assuming they are using this in the sense of political particularism which is opposed to multicultural pluralism.
The amount of hypocrisy you read in this document will depend on if you think Soros is genuinely devoted to multiculturalism or uses such causes like the "low-hanging fruit" to affect change and open up markets and resources for himself and his allies. It should be an interesting read either way.
Executive Summary
In this portfolio TTF is pioneering demonstration projects countering state capture. State capture is the institutionalized particularistic influence of organized actors over policy formation and implementation, which negatively impacts the fundamentals of a democratic system, the logic of governance, social norms, and trust in public institutions. A captured state directly contradicts the idea of an open society. In this portfolio we have worked to support grantees countering state capture in a number of countries. At the same time, we have invested in improving conceptual clarity by identifying differences between state capture as a problem requiring a systemic approach and issues of transparency and accountability that could be tackled through anti-corruption measures.
While we are only at the outset in terms of the conceptual work, through our portfolio we have gained experience that has enabled us to understand how to steer not only our grantee-partners to take a systemic approach, but also to inspire other donors1 to rethink their approach to the issue. The lessons we learned on supporting coalitions, on shaping the field of anti-corruption, accountability and good governance, and on selection of best instruments of support will help us adjust and integrate similar work of OSIFE into a single consolidated portfolio in 2016, based on TTF’s theory of change and conceptual groundwork.
Introduction
Building upon a legacy of support since November 2006, this work was reorganized into an independent portfolio in a follow-up to the TTF sub-board review on October 27, 2011.2 We further streamlined the portfolio during the process before the TTF strategy for 2014-17. In line with this strategy, we formed a fully separate portfolio, budget, and category of work, under the Level 3 program name of “2B Countering State Capture,” identical with the category of work “CTI002-THINK TANK FUND: Support demonstration projects [Countering State Capture].”
Theory of Change
This portfolio is based on an assumption that a captured state—substantial, institutionalized, particularistic, self-interested influence or control of unrepresentative actors over public finances, policy formation and implementation—directly contradicts the idea of an open society. State capture is one of the most daunting issues in state reform and transition, a fundamental challenge for weak states and societies where the watchdog function of civil society is not yet fully developed. State capture negatively impacts the fundamentals of a democratic system, the logic of governance, social norms, and trust in public institutions. While state capture is sometimes mistaken for grand corruption and conventional anti-corruption measures are therefore proposed to counter it, these address only the design of nominally independent state institutions, overlooking the structure of the political system and the prevailing value structure of societies. Countering state capture is not primarily anti-corruption work.
While corruption may be one of the ways a captured state functions, it is not the only one or the most important, and this needs to be taken into account when designing an approach to tackling it. Too much emphasis on corruption can detract from real governance problems. Hungary provides a real-world example. While there is wide consensus that the grasp of the ruling government on public life and the extent of state capture is unprecedented, perception of corruption in Hungary in the past two years is at its lowest level since 1995, when Transparency International inaugurated the Corruption Perceptions Index.
This observation is consistent with our own theory of change, where we argue that state capture as an organized system can in fact be one of the most effective means of reducing corruption. Corruption outside of the state capture context is essentially a pluralist exercise, with individuals and business paying a bribe in hopes of affecting the outcome, but without having full certainty over it. In a captured state the outcome is predetermined, regardless of whether the transaction involves corruption. If there is corruption in a captured state, it is mostly a streamlined, controlled, and organized tool assuring particularism of the ruling elites.
State Capture vs Anti-Corruption: Key Distinctions
This distinction between corruption and state capture is important in the remedies that it implies. We see corruption as a possible but not always necessary tool of organized particularism. Organizations using anticorruption lenses, especially watchdogs, tend to focus on individual cases and work on the basis of a theory of change that emphasizes the moral failure of the individual and the belief that more public information about the case will bring about the necessary policy change. Unfortunately we have not seen this theory deliver. The extent of corruption in CEE countries is widely known, and even when a surprise release of information happens, or the arrogance of captors crosses the threshold of public acceptance, it rarely leads to sustained public pressure for reform.
For example, the Gorilla scandal in Slovakia in 2011 and the appointment in summer of 2013 of Delyan Peevski as head of the secret service in Bulgaria both led to mass protests and the firing of exposed individuals, but the public response in itself was not sufficient to achieve systemic change. When corruption is observed in a captured state, policies based on suppressing it (or its publicity) frequently result in a disproportionate emphasis on petty corruption, rather than delivering better governance and higher public trust in democracy. In Slovakia, for example, according to TI data 48% of corruption cases that made it to court were for bribes below €20 ($22) and only three percent for bribes over €5,000 ($5,586). Only five percent of all cases involved public governance (procurements, elections, subsidies), and not a single corruption case involving senior elected or government official made it to court.
Because state capture is systemic, yet highly varied in form, countering it requires a different approach from fighting corruption in a functioning democracy. Policy-makers, practitioners, and concerned citizens who wish to address state capture must gain detailed, documented information about actual structures and processes that accompany it. When state captors enjoy full judicial impunity, exposing individual cases does not deliver policy improvements, but rather contributes to citizens’ disenchantment with democracy, leading to lower voter turnout and/or increased support for extremist political parties. The election of the radical neo-fascist Marian Kotleba in central Slovakia is an example of this dynamic.
State capture is based on an opaque relationship between the captors of the state (principals) and their agents in elected or executive positions. Trying to pinpoint where state capture starts is akin to answering the proverbial chicken and egg question; nonetheless we see that financing of political parties is often the egg of state capture. Running a modern political campaign requires excessive amounts of cash.3 On the one hand this creates an insurmountable barrier to entry for potential new political parties outside the establishment, while on the other hand it allows established oligarchs (principals) to diversify their political portfolio and provide support to potential new entrants who offer fresh faces for the public to vote for.
This is one of the explanations why political corruption in Hungary has been on the agenda of only non-mainstream parties such as LMP (Politics Can Be Different), and Jobbik. Once the political party makes it into power, it needs to return the favor and pay back its debt. This happens in a number of ways, public procurement being perhaps the most common. Other ways include the placement of captors’ agents in important positions, from parliaments to regulatory authorities (where a clear overlap with regulatory capture, which is more common in Western Europe, appears), to the law enforcement and judiciary.4
Ultimately, the paths of state capture can be traced along two dimensions: economic resources and political power, with the understanding that these are effectively two sides of the same coin. Political power generates economic resources, and those in turn can be exchanged into and reinforce political power. Another important aspect where we can clearly discern the captured state is in the erosion of checks and balances, both formal and informal. The capture of watchdog institutions such as the media is a clear marker. Throughout Central and Eastern Europe we see the retreat of economic investors from media ownership, replaced by individuals alleged to be the “owners” or “godfathers” of the state.
Countering State Capture: An Agenda for Change
State capture is as opaque and elusive as it is widespread and deeply rooted, and countering it requires policy reforms that may not favor the ruling elites. This can happen either by stealth, when captors do not realize that a policy concession will limit the scope of capture, or as a result of sustained public pressure under which even captured institutions go against the interests of their captors. Even after such an initial success, the challenge is keeping reformed institutions out of the captors’ orbit. In order to make gains permanent, civil society and anti-state capture coalitions need to ensure there is a critical mass of agencies that are not under state capture. It is only in the last phase, once the systemic nature of capture has been broken, that the traditional anti-corruption approach can be utilized and the countering state capture can give way to an accountability approach to countering corruption.
Given the systemic nature of state capture, our hypothesis is that the most effective way of exerting public pressure to counter it is through cooperation and wide coalitions of concerned individuals, NGOs (including watchdogs and think tanks), businesses, and reform-minded politicians. While these coalitions are often able to reap tremendous emotional energy when the public learns of specific instances of state capture, unless they have policy researchers or think tanks involved and able to present workable policy reform recommendations, they often fail to devise feasible and achievable strategies for countering state capture. We have decided to support specifically think tanks because we believe that coalitions to counter state capture will be ineffective without the intellectual muscle that research centers provide.
Based on this theory of change, we have decided to test the hypothesis that think tanks are in a good position to identify the systemic vulnerabilities of the captured state, and devise policy proposals that intellectually support counter-state capture coalitions and help them pressure captured institutions to reform, focusing scarce energies and resources to where the potential for success is largest. Think tanks also have the skill-set to sit through endless technical meetings with ministries, tirelessly follow policy proposals, and push improvements one paragraph at a time, as we have seen with Frank Bold in the Czech Republic, or Via Iuris in Slovakia.
Scope of the Portfolio
The main approach we have employed to test this theory of change is funding demonstration projects. When choosing these projects, we had three priorities: 1) systematic analysis of state capture; 2) remedies to state capture either through development of policy responses or specific support to existing civic coalitions to devise and implement policy recommendations and strategic advocacy efforts; and 3) identifying and countering cross-border aspects of state capture.5 We have also provided support to networking and knowledge-exchange events for policy research and other civil society actors to analyze and discuss possible approaches to countering state capture.
In order to promote the concept of countering state capture systemically, we have also shaped discourse by attending and speaking at conferences, as well as publishing and amplifying features of the demonstration projects we supported. Finally, we have convened new cross-border collaborations among think tanks and helped them in seeking external third-party funding, especially from the European Commission. From 2012 to date,6 the size of this portfolio is $2,260,093. The portfolio includes 1) organizational project grants ($2,221,879); 2) networking and knowledge exchange activities consisting of two events supported by TTF ($28,598), and convening and support of consortia applying for external funding (no direct costs, cofunding of $50,000 is included in grants); and 3) shaping discourse through external publications both staffauthored and contracted ($9,616),7 and participation of TTF staff in external events.
Analysis of the Portfolio
In order to illustrate the patterns in choices made, developments observed, and lessons learned, we focus our analysis on a country-case selection from five priority countries: Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Romania and Slovakia. We have also provided support to projects in Croatia, Slovenia, and Latvia that we consider “scouting” countries.
Criteria for Evaluating Success
Expecting that a single donor’s effort could liberate the state from its captors would be an ambitious proposition, which we never made. Our expectation for success in supporting these projects was rather in the extent to which they contributed to countering state capture efforts based on a number of factors. We did not conduct systematic evaluations of the extent of state capture in the individual countries, and so without having a solid baseline, in the current portfolio review we do not aim at quantifying the extent to which our funding contributed to decreasing state capture. The criteria for success we use are: 1) Public awareness of the systemic nature of the problem and presence in the public domain and knowledge of illustrative cases of state capture; 2) Existence of opportunity8 for countering state capture, in terms of existence, structure, and strength of (or possibility to create) synergic ecosystems of actors to push for systematic political reform, as well as in terms of existence of functional partnerships and coordinating actors; 4) Political opportunity to set and advance the counter-state-capture agenda (existence of pro-reform political elite, or at least absence of strong anti-reform veto-players); 5) Match between the policy opportunity present, and the contribution delivered by think tanks with our support.
This could be in the immediate policy research contribution to the coalition, or in the form of preparing building blocks for future use in coalitions. We measure success also through the relevance and timeliness of the intellectual contributions or research findings our grantees provided in each specific country.
Based on these criteria we are able to categorize both the countries and the individual projects supported. We see positive developments in the Czech Republic and Romania, followed by Slovakia. Developments in Bulgaria and Hungary are less hopeful, with Hungary being currently the most challenging case for pursuing this type of reform. The “scouting” countries are countries where we have seen the need coupled with emerging opportunities and have either attempted to provide support but the response was not sufficient (Slovenia, and Latvia few years ago), or where we are hoping to promote systemic governance reform but are too early in our efforts to evaluate impact (Croatia and Latvia after 2015). In terms of projects9 we have seen a spectrum ranging from full success, to missed chances, to contexts without opportunity.
Ranking the Cases
A) Trailblazers and Example-setters We have observed success in terms of criteria of process and outcome in the Czech Republic, when our support to the Frank Bold Society10 contributed to countering state capture by building the knowledge base and awareness of the systemic nature of the problem, and to the emergence of a coalition and its healthy functioning and coordination. This paid off in action when grantees we supported were able to reach potential policymakers before the elections in 2013, which resulted in 166 out of the 200 deputies in the Chamber of Deputies signing a counter-state capture pledge consisting of adoption of nine specific anticorruption laws.11 In this case the match between the policy opportunity and the contribution think tanks delivered with our support was excellent. The support we provided to Frank Bold delivered both the systematic analysis and the priority-setting, but the policy reform steps were advanced by one of the most inspiring counter-state capture coalitions in the region.12 “Reconstructing the State” at its peak was an unprecedented pledge campaign pushing for reform of the captured state in Czech Republic, combining active citizens, more than 20 civil society organizations, renowned experts, members of the business community, business chambers and associations, and reformminded politicians.
The complexity of state capture requires choosing a good set of “core” issues. Ideally, these should start with relatively low-hanging fruit, so that the initial interest in a systemic approach can be rewarded within a reasonable time period. At the same time, they need to target vulnerable pivots of the captured state governance system. The “Reconstructing the State” campaign managed to identify these fulcrums in its clear goal pushing for adoption of the specific anti-corruption laws. The number of requests reflects the local conditions and the level of ambition of those proposing it.
The success of this campaign came about mainly because of the combination of opportunity that emerged in the Czech Republic and the intellectually rigorous contribution of a number of think tanks that worked with Frank Bold. The convening of the coalition took place with help from the US Embassy in Prague and Open Society Foundation Prague. Our support enabled Frank Bold not only to contribute to the design of the pledge including the nine laws,13 and rigorous policy research on specific policy recommendations, but also to coordinate forming and running the coalition. The case of Romania can also be seen as a success. The support we provided mainly to the Romanian Academic Society (RAS) contributed to their forming of a “Coalition for Clean Romania.” RAS and its president Alina Mungiu-Pippidi (OSIFE Board Member) have become one of the leaders in the European scene analyzing accountability, corruption, and state capture.
While claiming that we are responsible for this would be farfetched, our support enabled RAS to contribute to the Clean Romania Coalition with important policy products and knowledge of the systemic nature of state capture in Romania. Unfortunately the ecosystem in Romania is much more fragmented and polarized, so we have not seen as wide cooperation as in the case of the Czech Republic. Nonetheless our support has enabled individual contributions in addition to RAS in the form of policy reform recommendations from the Association Institute for Public Policy, Median Research Centre (MRC), Expert Forum, and the Romanian Center for European Policies. In this way we have contributed to making the efforts at countering-state capture in Romania multi-polar. Even if full-scale collaboration among all actors does not yet seem possible, we see improved communication and limited coordination across the organizations on the most important subjects.
B) Followers The success of the Czech coalition went “viral” and inspired organizations in other countries to at least think about systematic ways of countering state capture in their own countries. Two clear follow-up campaigns emerged in the region. In Slovakia, SGI followed the example of “Reconstructing the State” closely, and designed a local equivalent in “The Good Candidates” (Správni Kandidáti). The pledges for individual candidates in Slovakia allowed for some flexibility (candidates did not have to sign up for all nine priorities). These pledges fell into three broader categories: procurement, public ownership, and provision of services;14 access to information, transparency, and improved communication;15 and the transparency of Council meetings.16 While we have had many successful individual projects in Slovakia, we have realized that a systematic approach to funding is needed. Therefore, simultaneously as we were discussing project support to Via Iuris for analysis of the system assuring impunity for captors of the state, we sought an independent local convener. The role of an independent convener that OSF Prague undertook in the Czech Republic could not have been implemented in Slovakia by the local OSF foundation, because of the difficult leadership transition and the different priorities of the previous executive director. In order to provide for a local coordinator who would not have a conflict of interest either with the policy researchers or with the advocacy organizations, Andrej reached out to the Pontis Foundation, which had been running a corporate philanthropy operation “The Fund for Transparent Slovakia” that supported the very same organizations as we had within this portfolio. This meant Pontis was not perceived as a competitor, and at the same time had intimate knowledge of the organizations and their synergies and animosities.
Thanks to the cooperation between Via Iuris and Pontis Foundation a coalition started to emerge. The coalition consists of four organizations: Via Iuris, SGI, the Pontis Foundation, and Let's Stop Corruption foundation. Transparency International Slovakia, Fair Play Alliance, and INEKO are not formally part of the coalition, but they have agreed to informally coordinate their actions and advocacy with it. We consider this an emerging success in Slovakia that we will be able to learn even more from, and will evaluate it after the parliamentary elections in early 2016.
C) Missed Chances and Disappointments A major disappointment in this portfolio has been support to Transparency International Hungary (TI-HU). In 2013, after three years of excellent cooperation with the organization, we thought we had found a partner who could spearhead Hungarian counter-state capture efforts. We awarded them a three-year grant, one of the longest programmatic support grants TTF has awarded in the EU. Our expectation was that TI-HU would use our support to capitalize on their previous efforts, extend their funding base, and lead intellectually in the systematic countering of particularism and state capture in Hungary.
Unfortunately, the executive director of the organization departed to join academia, and her replacement had a different vision and different qualities. The executive director’s departure was followed by the departure of a number of leading staff members and senior experts (two joined TI’s headquarters in Berlin). The organization lost its intellectual drive, leadership, and creativity. All this became visible with a networking and knowledge-exchange event that we initially aimed to support through a hands-off grant in 2013. In the absence of leadership from TI-HU, TTF staff (Andrej) had to step in, design the agenda of the meeting, and even take a hands-on approach to managing the event itself. We managed to limit the damage from that particular event, but the three-year grant commitment remained. While TI-HU delivered according to the grant contract, the quality was mediocre. We considered rescinding the grant, but in the dire situation of Hungarian civil society and TI-HU due to the government’s policies we would have risked this being misunderstood, and could have added to the struggles of the civil society sector in Hungary. Thus we carried on, even if it meant additional staff time and delays in delivery during the first 18 months, after which project performance improved. This has been a significant lesson not only within this portfolio, reminding us that past performance is no guarantee of future success, especially if intellectual leadership depends disproportionately on a few individuals.
Less a disappointment and more a missed opportunity was the original Hungarian coalition modeled on the Czech example, in this case called “At a Minimum” (‘Ez A minimum’). Unfortunately the pledge campaign with six groups of proposals17 failed to receive traction at the national level, mainly because what were called minimum requirements were presented vaguely yet extensively, and in a language that allowed the political majority to reject the reform proposal as being affiliated with the party opposition.18 Given that not only political representation is polarized according to political lines, but also civil society, an initiative coming from the left-liberal side of civil society without any representation from the center-right19 created an additional obstacle in reaching beyond the already persuaded. The organizations collaborating on the campaign (TI-HU, K-Monitor, Atlatszo.hu, and Political Capital) tried to revive it during the municipal elections following the example of Slovakia’s “Good Candidates,” and both make it less party-political and refocus it from the national to the municipal level, where more non-partisan candidates were running.
We provided support to these efforts in the form of four contracts to the founding organizations to monitor electoral irregularities and diagnose state capture at the municipal level. The wide(r) coalitions, including “At a Minimum” and the additional work on elections,20 have fostered better cooperation. But unlike in the Czech case they have not managed to reach beyond the opposition (left-wing and liberal) side of the civil society. While the results at the municipal level were somewhat more promising, with more constructive relations especially with politically non-aligned counsellors and mayors, overall the results of our support in Hungary remain mixed.
A second major disappointment was in a contract we awarded to a journalist to cover a case of countering state capture in the Czech Republic through a number of different products that should have formed a package. The aim of the case study package was to allow organizations and individual stakeholders from other countries to learn from a specific experience in the Czech Republic, to assess the suitability of this approach, and possibly also to apply some of the tools and strategies to their national contexts. The case study was to be written in a story-telling form and published in general interest media outlets. The sources of disappointment were two-fold: first, the contractor delivered the texts with significant delays; second, the organic placement of the articles did not proceed as expected, and he succeeded in having only one article published in Newsweek with a second article having been considered by Foreign Policy, which eventually went with a different article on the topic by different authors. Both of the texts were of good quality and written in a captivating manner. The multimedia material (interviews) was of acceptable quality, even if not in the form we expected (audio instead of video). Nonetheless, we had much higher hopes than what was delivered. The lesson learned is that it is not feasible, or at least not likely, to hire a single provider to deliver multiple outputs (texts, data, and video). The second lesson is that having articles published in the international press is not something we can dictate, as the news cycle lives according to its own logic. Also it seems that the choice to hire a British journalist when targeting global audience was not the best, and we should have been more precise in our expectations for audience and geographic scope. The objective we had of spreading the news about the counter-state capture coalition was partly achieved, because international media covered the story of the Czech Republic even if we did not pay for those texts.21
An academic unrelated to us produced a detailed case study. What we could have done instead is support a researcher (whether through contract, competition, or as a TTF intern) in compiling the story of the coalition in the form of a case study that could be taken on by those interested in learning or replicating. TTF staff writing Open Society Voices blogs in combination with attending events where potential followers already are, or where donors potentially interested in supporting this work congregate, was much more effective in reaching the right audience with the right message.22
Networking, Knowledge - sharing, and Experimenting
In addition to providing grants for projects, we have also supported the organization of two events.23 The first was the knowledge-sharing event held by TI-HU, which taught us a hard lesson in the importance of organizational assessment as described in detail in the section on disappointments above. The exploratory workshop was supposed to center on transparency of state-owned enterprises, providing an opportunity for networking and capacity-building, as well as experience in research methodology and advocacy. Due in no small part to TI-HU’s management problems, however, attendance was low and the outputs were mediocre. The second event we co-organized with the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace (CEIP) and their Middle East Center as an inter-regional experience and knowledge-sharing meeting on state capture October 20-21, 2014 in Istanbul.
We focused on two sets of transitional countries (Central and Southeastern Europe and several countries of the Middle East and North Africa). The selected countries were not resource-rich, but they shared the characteristics that state capture is prevalent, undermines government legitimacy, and poses major obstacles to state reform. This cooperation worked very well,24 with excellent follow-up and contribution to informing one of the seminal monographs on state capture and structural corruption, Sarah Chayes’ Thieves of State. As a consequence, we have noticed greater interest in structural work on analysis of and countering state capture particularly in Southeastern Europe.
Additionally, we have observed more desire for methodological rigor, as reflected in higher-quality proposals since the meeting. In addition to these formal events, we have also experimented with approaches to scouting for new partners and projects. In order to provide country-focus and increase responses to calls for proposals, TTF Staff organized in-country meetings with prospective applicants.25 Andrej organized a joint meeting with eight organizations in Slovakia (former and current grantees as well as three NGOs new to TTF) in late July 2014.26 It was surprising to realize that for some of these attending organizations, such a meeting was the first opportunity they had had to learn what others in their own country were doing. It was shocking to discover that we as an external donor know these organizations and their activities, in much greater depth than they do for each other. In early August 2014, Andrej organized a similar meeting with Hungarian organizations that had approached TTF and OSIFE with suggestions to work on a number of relevant issues. That meeting was followed by cooperation between four organizations during the municipal elections (assessed and processed under the rapid response procedures). In late August 2014, Andrej together with Sanjukta organized two group meetings for ten organizations during their visit to Bucharest.27
The fact that we had to organize two separate meetings is illustrative of the organizational and personal animosities in Romania, even if the partial overlap signals potential for cooperation. We have also been active in showcasing the work of our grantees to the European Commission and fostering collaboration among several of our grantees to apply jointly for EC funding. We have built an informal but regular communication channel with DG Competition and DG Justice through which we showcase the work of our grantees and promote their expertise. When the European Commission announced a funding opportunity of up to EUR 6.2 million in November 2014 through its Directorate General for Migration and Home Affairs we convened a series of discussions that resulted in six separate consortia applying for the EU money.28 Of these six consortia, one of them received a grant of EUR 367,640 ($412,475),29 nearly equivalent to our annual grant budget within this portfolio (the 2015 budgeted amount for grants before internal reallocation was $440,000). The winning consortium is a brand-new grouping that clearly formed as a result of our convening. There are two lessons from this experience. First, the funding opportunities from the EU appear on extremely short notice, and are highly competitive. Second, we can contribute to successful applications for external funding through our convening power and staff-time commitment30 in ways that increase our impact beyond our budget. Finally, we have also spread the word about our work and approaches tested by our grantees through numerous speaking opportunities and publications, including OS Voices pieces and advocacy meetings with other donors. While not easy to precisely quantify the impact, we have contributed to shaping the systematic understanding of governance problems in Europe.
We have noticed an increased (or revived) use of the state capture concept, both in academic publications but also among some think tanks and watchdog organizations that previously called all of their work anti-corruption.
Conclusions and Lessons learned
During the development of this portfolio, we made a number of choices, some of which have proved right, and some of which we wish we had avoided. From these we have learned a number of lessons about our theory of change, our concept of state capture, and how a donor can and cannot support this work:
Conceptual Innovation: state capture vs. corruption
Our work in this portfolio has shown the need for greater conceptual clarity. While the foundations have been laid, and the basic interest and understanding of the need for conceptualization of this work as systemic phenomenon is not questioned as much as it used to be, we continue to see a need for developing a robust conceptual framework.
Particularism in governance and rent-seeking in public resource distribution are not illegal. It is therefore necessary to analyze state capture systemically, and understand how they differ from the conventional conception of corruption as an individual moral failure, and crime punishable under existing law.31 When dealing with state capture, focusing on accountability and anti-corruption is like battling the hydra: each time one of the heads is removed, another pops up. When transparency of state budgets became widespread, the unscrupulous principals of state capture adapted their modes of public resource extraction and focused on public procurement, PPPs, and state-owned companies.
By refocusing the attention of organizations on understanding the issue not as the moral failure of an individual, or a criminal behavior, but as a governance design flaw in states, they are able to see when anti-corruption rhetoric is abused and the reform agenda hijacked by populists or even by captors themselves. There is certainly more work still to be done in developing the conceptual framework, both intellectually and for practical purposes.
Increasing knowledge of state capture in the public domain could lead to wider social support for counter-state capture coalition. But it also presents a challenge in form of potentially feeding antisystem populist political parties that attempt to adopt the anti-state capture agenda and feed anti-mainstream conspiracies. Pro forma reforms from mainly populist (and sometimes non-democratic) political forces are a new challenge. We see this unfolding in the Czech Republic and partly in Slovakia, but unfortunately, at this moment we do not have a satisfactory answer as to how our partners should cope with this challenge.
The comparative event we convened in Istanbul helped us and our partners to better understand different iterations and forms of state capture. Thanks to these discussions we have witnessed progress in development of an analytical framework that provides interested parties with a set of questions to start understanding the scale and type of state capture they face. Especially from our more recent discussions and application submissions, we have noticed great demand for streamlining the analytical framework and establishing a shared methodology for comparing countries, but also a common ground to share experience.
In addition to our work, there are parallel conceptual developments, such as those spearheaded by Alina Mungiu Pippidi, or Sara Cheyes, but they have their own logics, which are not primarily policy-oriented.32 The need for more systematic mapping across countries, to assess both the extent of state capture and its dynamic across time and space nonetheless persists.
Collaboration
Our work thus far has shown the importance of collaboration. Once vulnerabilities in the system of state capture are identified, the most effective way of pushing systemic reform can be through a synergistic collaboration of different actors. To build and maintain a wide coalition of supporters, anti-state capture governance reform proposals must be presented in non-partisan language. Coalitions that push these proposals require a coordinating actor who is not perceived as competing with the individual members of the coalition.
Cut off - ran out of reddit room.
submitted by bananawhom to DNCleaks [link] [comments]


2015.05.19 04:42 justonium Index--Begin here. (Indekso--Komencu ĉi tie.)

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Esperantan version aldonos frue malfrue, aŭ eble neniam. :P
This page will be edited regularly as new content is added to the subreddit.
Welcome!

Table of contents of this page:

1. Introduction to this page
2. Brief summary of the Mneumonese project
3. Comprehensive summary of the Mneumonese project
4. Links to further reading
5. Table of some lexemes assigned rhyme structures in Mneumonese 4 thus far
6. Questions for readers of this page

1. Introduction to this page:

The purpose of this page is (1): to provide an entry point to reading about the Mneumonese project and (2): to navigating this subreddit.
The purpose of this subreddit is (1): to display the Mneumonese project to the public, in the hopes of sharing knowledge and obtaining feedback, and (2): to keep all of my public writings pertaining to the project organized in one place.
If you feel that anything is missing here, you can tell me in the comments feel free to PM me, and I'll try to add whatever it is that's missing.
Also note that a lot of posts on here may appear irrelevant at first; to those who may think so, I now {quote secondhand and in my own words} a university professor whom I worked with briefly: apparent irrelevancy doesn't necessarily preclude utility.

2. Brief summary of the Mneumonese project:

  • Mneumonese is an in-progress constructed language that shares significant structure with the constructed languages Lojban, aUI, Esperanto, and Láadan/Langlish.
  • There is a two dimensional and a one dimensional form of the language; the two dimensional form can only be drawn, but is useful for thinking; the one dimensional form is useful for communication in real time.
  • The language is synthetic down to the smallest phonemic elements; all words are thus synthesized metaphorically out of smaller mnemonic meanings. This means that the lexicon is easy to memorize. The lexicon is also rather small, more complex meanings being synthesized out of simpler lexemes.
  • The language exposes more of the communication game than natural languages do. This property, combined with the logical semantics and regular grammar, mean that a computer algorithm can convert back and forth between the one dimensional (spoken) and two dimensional (graphical) forms of the language. This property also makes the language an interesting tool for introspective conversations.
  • The language is designed to facilitate efficient debate, and has features which discourage certain 'dirty' debate tactics.
  • The language's grammar and morphology are designed to be easy to free-write in without breaking grammar rules. It is especially hard to do this in languages like English, which convey much meaning using word order, and easier to do this in languages like Esperanto, which have freer word order.
  • I'm working on a piece of software that does all the stuff I would like to do with Mneumonese, English, Esperanto, and other languages as well.
See also:
A concise description of the origins of Mneumonese,
Mneumonese in a nutshell,
Mneumonese in another nutshell, and
The prominent design goals of Mneumonese.

3. Comprehensive summary of the Mnemonese project:

  • The main idea: Mneumonese is more than just a spoken/written language. In addition to its spoken/written form, which exists in just one dimension, there is an alternative form which cannot be expressed in one dimension, but can be drawn in the form of two-dimensional diagrams. This higher-dimensional form of Mneumonese is called Graphical Mneumonese (and nicknamed (nick-spelled?) "Mne(u)monese"), while the spoken/written form is called Linear Mneumonese (or just simply, "Mneumonese"). So far, three four phono-morphologies have been made to assign sound to Linear Mneumonese, which I refer to as Mneumonese 1, Mneumonese 2, Mneumonese 3, and Mneumonese 4. Graphical Mneumonese is designed to represent information similarly to how humans (mainly the designer) think, while Linear Mneumonese is designed to serve as a means of communication of Graphical Mneumonese between two or more people. By following a set of agreed upon rules, one person can 'walk' along an idea that is represented in that person's mind in Graphical Mneumonese, and speak the pieces of the mental 'path', one step at a time. By exactly the reverse process, the listener can follow a set of similar rules in order to build their own mental structure out of Graphical Mneumonese as they listen to those same spoken pieces that the speaker spoke. By means of this completely explicit and algorithmic language, communication between anyone capable of visualizing Graphical Mneumonese can be standardized, with the result of increased efficiency and precision of communication. Here is a picture from the Mneumonese 2 era with Graphical Mneumonese on top, romanized Linear Mneumonese in the middle, and Ideaographic Linear Mneumonese on the bottom. And here is some more Mneumonese 2 era graphical Mneumonese, glossed in English rather than Mneumonese 2.
  • Graphical Mneumonese can also be used as a computer representation. This representation captures all grammar, and captures some, but not all, semantics. A computer algorithm can parse Linear Mneumonese into Graphical Mneumonese by following the same rules that a human would. By the reverse process, a computer algorithm can also turn a 'grammatical path' through Graphical Mneumonese into Linear Mneumonese--again, by following the same rules that a human would. Together, these two capabilities allow for a language interface with a computer.
  • There is a restricted pair of dialects of both Linear Mneumonese and Graphical Mneumonese which are together known as Programmatic Mneumonese. Computer algorithms can be written in Linear Programmatic Mneumonese (also nick-spelled "Mneumanese"), and, once they are parsed into Graphical Programmatic Mneumonese (a. k. a. "Mne(u)manese"), they can be executed by an interpreter. (And one can of course also just program directly in Graphical Programmatic Mneumonese.)
  • Mneumonese is automatically parsable not only sentence-by-sentence, but also at the discourse level. All of this is enabled by (1): logical, near-idiom-free semantics, (2): regular grammar, and (3): a rich collection of conjunctions and other discourse particles that express information that is usually not communicated in words in natural language. (The main exception being the conjunctions, which in fact do quite often have equivalent, if more polysemic, analogs in most natlangs). These features are also relevant for anyone wishing to push the limits of the efficiency of human-to-human communication further than is possible with natural languages. (Note that there are also techniques for 'bending' natural languages into machines of greater communicative efficiency, many of which are discovered without much notice as any relationship progresses.)
  • Mneumonese's phones (phones are indivisible sounds) are assigned to visual concepts, so that when they are put together to form a word, their visual meanings can be put together to form an image that is a metaphoric likeness of the word's meaning. Words that are formed in this way can further be modified metaphorically to derive a plethora of more abstract vocabulary. Here is an album of pictures from the Mneumonese 3 era illustrating its particular system of mnemonic and metaphoric synthesis.
  • The grammar of Linear Mneumonese is designed so as to be intuitive for use by humans (well, me), and so as to be easy for humans to memorize passages of it. The main principle that this goal imposes on the grammar is that, the grammar is organized such that, concepts that are near each other in Graphical Mneumonese, are also near each other in Linear Mneumonese.
  • There are evidentials and turn-taking rules and related discourse particles which it is considered rude and childish not to use when in debate. There are also words used for keeping the debate on topic using a 'shared memory palace' which both parties are expected to keep track of. These features help prevent dirty debate tactics such as red herrings and straw men.
  • Note that I have gone through several attempts at making a phono-morphology for Linear Mneumonese; I am currently working on the third and possibly fourth and probably final one.
  • I am also building a computer program which is to function as an editor for Spoken (non Programmatic (both Linear and Graphical)) Mneumonese and also as an interactive development environment for Programmatic Mneumonese. It is also a file system. In addition to handling Mneumonese, this editor is also designed to replace my need of all of the software that I currently use. I call this program The Mneumonese Platform. It uses a special document format which I am designing, which organizes ideas in a hierarchical yet inter-connected manner. In addition to serving as a storage and organization medium for one person's ideas, these documents also serve as a medium for communication between two or more people, and if used for that purpose, leave behind more organized and more easily navigable structures than do typical instant messaging programs. The entire editor is to be implemented in a visual, graphical programming language called TanScript Tang (tangible language), which is also designed by me.

4. Links to further reading

Here is a chronological list of the major posts about Mneumonese:
Earthk era:
A post about the project back when the graphical language corresponded to Earthk (an English derivative) instead of Linear Mneumonese
Mneumonese 1 era:
Brief project summary, and an overview of the first phono-morphology
Mneumonese 2 era:
Comprehensive project summary
The romanized writing system
The original mnemonic atoms and the second phono-morphology
The native (phono-mnemonic) phonetic writing system
Some updates to the mnemonic atoms
Mneumonese 3 era:
The third phono-morphology (antiquated)
The reformed mnemonic atoms of the third phono-morphology (antiquated)
Mneumonese's metaphoric derivation system explained with examples
Reference tables for the mnemonic atoms
English mnemonics for the mnemonic atoms
An English-friendly romanization for the third phono-morphology
A visuo-mnemonic writing system for Mneumonese. (antiquated)
Updated English-friendly romanization
The two native writing systems, and the English romanization (the visuo-mnemonic system has all new vowel symbols which are also phono-mnemonic)
Mneumonese: a language for having dialogues that are collaborative monologues, for talking about what we think in Now, and building on it while it's still alive
Four new sounds: /b/, /d/, /g/, and /ʡ/
Deep Text era:
The following four posts follow a diversion into work on the Mneumonese Platform during the year I spent as a graduate student at Georgia Tech.
My Search for a More Powerful Written Medium for the Internet
An elevator pitch on Tang (TanScript), the programming language underneath Deep Text (the Mneumonese platform)
Toward releasing Deep Text to the public
Deep Text in three sentences
Pre Mneumonese 4 era:
The following eight posts follow the development of the never-fully-fleshed-out experimental version of Mneumonese 4 which I now refer to as Pre Mneumonese 4.
The mnemonic atoms of the fourth phonomorphology
A writing system for the 20 Chekhov-based mnemonic atoms of the fourth phonomorphology.
Serious discussion: I think I've discovered some of the root causes of the world's suffering.
The six types of motion (inspired from Michael Chekhov's four types of motion
A tentative guide to restoring harmony and vigor to the body
The fourteen archetypal actions
The fourteen archetypal characters
The seven archetypal elements and their corresponding archetypal types of movement
Metaphysical era:
The following seven posts follow a string of research into Chinese Medicine and the Tarot, which ultimately led to the foundations of the contemporary, Eight-Element version of Mneumonese 4.
An Eight Circuit Theory of Emotion
New alchemical theory suggested by overlaying two existing repositories of alchemical knowledge: The Book of Thoth, and Traditional Chinese Medicine
What happens if we interpret the human not through Chinese Medicine's five Element lens, but through a six Element lens?
An Emotion Waffle
The Emotions of the Earth and Cosmos
The Emotion Waffle, translated into Chinese
Regarding the Five Elements and the Energy-Entropy plane
Contemporary Mneumonese 4 era:
The Eight Elements
The temporal cycles
The colors
The vowels
The Core
The growing crystal
The crystal grows bigger
The Eight Chi
Two new perspectives of the Eight Chi
The vowels of the correlatives (antiquated)
From correlatives to copula (antiquated)
The eight evidentials
The eight articles
The (eight) types of motion
From articles to quotation particles
The eight time particles
The bridge between the vowels and the consonants, thermodynamics, and Tarot (antiquated)
Eight grammatical moods, and the three dimensions of antonymity
The eight particles for handling the movement of the speaking privilege
A bridge between the Eight Chi and the Chakra System
Towards a spoken language whose words are built in a crystalline rhyme structure in likeness of the Tarot
The Chinese Medicine division of reality
The eight qualitative measures, and the eight forms of relative motion
Causality
Possession (antiquated)
The eight flavors
Space, a bridge between mood and causality
The eight forms of exchange (antiquated)
The eight forms of exchange, recrystallized
The four mobile coordinate systems
The eight textures
The eight forms of matter, as a bridge between textures and styles of relative motion
...
[...]
A brief history of the conlang Mneumonese
[...]
The Eight Channels of Perception
[...]
The Eight Informational Motions, and the Eight Forms of Exchange revisited
The eight qualitative distances
The eight parts of speech, and the eight qualifiers
The eight logical operators, and the Eight Social Motions re-explored
The eight relative quantities
The eight relative quantities, revisited in Social Context
The eight behavioral roles
The Eight Chi revisited, with Alchemical Terminology
The Eight Elements revisited, in Alchemical Light
The eight conditional particles
The eight logical operators revisited in unary context, and the correlative prefixes recrystallized
The eight definitional roles
The eight behavioral roles, revisited in Social Context
[...]
The Ten Vowels
The eight conjunctions [NSFW]
The eight topological forms, and (another) Alchemical Factorization of the Eight Elements
[...]
Upcoming Posts:
The eight topological forms revisited, in historical context
The Eight 'Un-Motions' (formerly known as the eight pathologies of mind)
The eight etherico-chemical, physical-metabolic, informational-energetic blockages (and related bio-physically self-regulatory craving-responses)
The eight functional relationships, and possession revisited (antiquated) (to be revisited later)
The\<-- that I previously suggested)) Eight Circuit Theory of Emotion, revised
...
From space, to time
The sixteen social roles
Eight more grammatical moods
...
The eight discontinuities of flow
The From flow-uler discontunities to mathematical operators
The eight structural roles: a hub and cornerstone connecting four hitherto disparate mnemonic lattice structures
The eight modes of speech
The eight personal roles, and the Eight Social Motions re-traversed
...
The eight definitional operators: a second bridge between two hitherto nearly-disparate mnemonic lattice structures
The eight relative scopes: a set of eight versatile lexemes that can function as: copula/adpositions, just like their semantically near-by neighbors the relative locations and relative times; discourse particles for connecting between semantic scope within a discussion or shared memory palace, and; eight more definitional operators
The Consonants
More to come!
Posts about Tang (TanScript) and Programmatic Mneumonese:
Tanscript: the fundamental structure (la fundamenta strukturo)
A summary of the Tanscript programming language.
A description of what the Mneumonese Platform is
What Tanscript is designed to do
Why I'm making the programming language Tanscript
The architecture of the Tanscript IDE
The Tanscript IDE is a programming-by-demonstration system
TanScript as a musical language
A detailed textual description of TanScript, including the individual primitive instructions
The Eight Informational Motions, and the Eight Forms of Exchange revisited
The eight logical operators, and the Eight Social Motions re-explored
The eight behavioral roles
The eight conditional particles
The eight logical operators revisited in unary context, and the correlative prefixes recrystallized
The eight definitional roles
The eight definitional operators
The eight relative scopes
Miscellanious resources:
My attempts at academic research
A table of some of the lexemes assigned sounds in Mneumonese 3 (organized along the crystalline structure of Mneumonese 3, and outdated now that Mneumonese 4 has further shaped the lexemes)
a very old (and ambitious) list of upcoming posts

5. Table of some lexemes assigned rhyme structure in Mneumonese 4 thus far:

vowel a ɒ o u y i ɪ e
number (antiquated) zero one two three four five six seven
cardinal direction south south-west west north-west north north-east east south-east
front/back direction downhill uphill originward destinationward behind in front backward forward
up/down direction groundward airward footward legward bottomward topward supportward loadward
left/right direction clockwise counterclockwise leftward rightward leftward rightward leftward rightward
color yellow green light blue dark blue white black red orange
flavor sweet savory salty minty bitter sour metallic spicy
sensation
tambre
texture smooth silky soft slippery rough abrasive hard sticky
region of the body waist chest neck face scalp tail crotch belly
emotion lust awe care grief fear thrill rage mirth
"entrancement"/'un-motion'/'pathology of mind' (compounds)
"infection"/"poison"/craving-of-what-biocomputationally-active-resource (compounds)
muscular motion heating chills yawning coughing shivering vocalizing tensing shaking sneezing
vocal motion sustained low voice pulsed low voice sustained lung voice pulsed lung voice sustained high voice pulsed high voice sustained throat voice pulsed throat voice
interjection yes, please here you go thank you sorry please, no! yes! hey! yup.
transfer of speech/speaking privilege punctuation finding it getting it lending it releasing it relinquishing it passing it requesting it keeping it
exchange theft giving/getting trading farewelling lending/borrowing sharing/using swapping greeting
informational/negentropic motion destroying creating copying replacing disconnecting connecting converting, spreading retaining, renewing
energetic motion taking, stealing receiving yielding, giving, sharing, holding letting go, releasing losing, relinquishing sending, spending imposing holding on, retaining
discontinuity of flow
mathematical operator
mental motion accepting, consuming becoming cooperating, sharing acknowledging rejecting, waiting avoiding attacking dismissing
linguistic motion dancing echoing singing seeing listening answering lecturing excusing
bodily motion/manner of change laying gliding sitting standing crouching flying climbing falling
social motion feeling, finding exploring shaping, being, exalting extracting, knowing, lamenting suggesting, listening discussing claiming, deciding supporting, celebrating
social status, relationship status (compounds) dating, courting engaged married widowed dependent apprenticed, in training employed, in service retired
personal status, parental status (compounds) trying, ripe expecting nursing, nurturing bereaved preparing engaging executing disengaging
evidential possibility probability belief fact intuition hypothesis evidence verification
perceptive channel motion/kinesthesia pose/proprioception thought/telepathy emotion/empathy hearing vision touch flavor
qualitative distance near upon within, together far from, apart almost exactly past not close to
tense/aspect might be going to be is now just was was earlier might happen happens now just happened happened earlier
compound tense particle - - - - later right now just then earlier
conditional particle if (state-to-action) then (state-to-action) if, since (state-to-state) then (state-to-state if, when (action-to-action) then (action-to-action) in the event that (action-to-state) then (action-to-state)
causal-sequential correlative postfix/causal role expectation, propensity realization, fallout, result motivation, reason destination, purpose, goal stimulus, trigger, causor reaction, response observation, evidence conclusion
relative time before after during not during until since, ever since, beginning for the duration of, while except during
behavioral correlative postfix/behavioral role beginning, setup, resource end, result, product behavior, mechanism action donor, previous, origin recipient, next, destination structure function (passive)
definitional role/dependential role operand, input operatement, output part, component gestalt whole, group referent reference, name actor role
topological role (antiquated) support (moved) load (moved) contents, content (moved) container (moved) language, encoding (retired) representation, idea (retired) substance, medium (retired) object (retired)
structural role support load contents, content container platform foot handle hand
topological form rod, stream tube ball, lump, bead hollow, hole, bubble ridge crevasse interface gap
conjunction which only follows, given in fact basically in other words despite but actually contrarily
relative form (compounds) through around core, center, surrounded all around, surrounding along (through, between) along (around, encasing) between on either side of
relative location under over inside outside bottom top interior exterior
relative quantity less more little much least most minimum maximum
strong grammatical mood (hard motive) have to able to need to willing to unable to don't have to unwilling to don't need to
weak grammatical mood (soft motive) want to considering to striving to open to diswant to considering to not striving to not open to not
qualitative relationship over capacity, overflowing at capacity, full under capacity, occupied empty, available out-matched evenly matched under-matched un-matched
style of relative motion jittering, hopping rushing flowing creeping fleeing orbiting pursuing drifting
state of matter plasma gas liquid semi-solid fine powder granular powder solid paste
copula (compounds pseudo-compounds (4.2.4)) happens goes has seems is at is on is like is a
part-of-speech event, process (change) relationship quality manner place direction entity category
qualifier partly substantial, continuous special diverse completely, whole singular, discrete ordinary, normal plain, regular
category of form (antiquated) property attire body mind owner bearer operator director
quantitative correlative postfix (antiquated) age duration complexity energy size length number scope
narrow correlative postfix (antiquated) moment rhythm tool (moved) agent (factored; moved) location path opponent (moved) ally, beneficiary (factored; moved)
personal role/grammatical role agent (initiatory) agent (involved) opponent obstacle beneficiary (initiatory) beneficiary (involved) co-agent, ally tool
wide correlative postfix (antiquated) interval, period schedule method manner region road form, thing, stuff kind, type
logical operator common, shared (intersection) conglomerate, total (union) critical, unique (reduction via complement-of-intersection) lacked, missing, every other (complement) and (logical conjunction) and/or (non-exclusive logical disjunction) either, or (exclusive logical disjunction) neither, nor (logical negation)
quantitative correlative prefix/quantitative instantiative operator every, each any which what some (two or more) one/some (one or more) one no (none)
correlative prefix (antiquated) this by us some every that by you what that over there every some this by me no
personal-locative correlative prefix/personal locator (re-antiquated) this by us this among all of us (factored) that by you that among y'all (factored) that over there that among them (factored) this by me this among us (factored)
personal locator this by/among us it (by/among us) that by you it (by you) that over there) it (over there) this by me it (by me)
pronoun (retired; factored (4.2.3)) (reinstated as dual namings (4.2.4)) you and me inclusive we you y'all it they me exclusive we
quotation particle we said... we said that. you said... you said that. they said... they said that. I said... I said that.
article a thing we said the thing we said a thing you said the thing you said a thing they said the thing they said a thing I said the thing I said
speech act morpheme (mode of speech/punctuation) (no direct Láadan equivalent; closest báa) (no direct Láadan equivalent; sometimes bée) (no direct Láadan equivalent; closest báa) báa bíi (or bée) bóo
definitional operator ideal (abstract) common (realized) example; non-non- non-example; non- prototype exemplar false example; in Láadan, ra- true non-example
scopular connective antecedent succedent hypocedent hypercedent precedent postcedent subcedent supercedent
more to be added soon...

6. Questions for readers of this page:

  • Regarding this subreddit: I've added three new link flairs to the 'edit flair' page of this subreddit, but there is still no option to flair a post. How do I fix this? Edit: Fixed, thank you.
  • What information is missing here? What are you not getting? What did I not explain clearly? What didn't I link to that I should have?
submitted by justonium to Mneumonese [link] [comments]


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